Category: <span>Women in Roofing</span>

Mycocycle Founder and CEO Named to Forbes Next 1000 2021

This inaugural list celebrates small business owners across the country on the road to success.

(Bolingbrook, Illinois) February 22, 2021 – Mycocycle, Inc., a leader in using mycoremediation to process toxins out of waste, announced today that its founder and CEO Joanne Rodriguez was named to the first class of 250 business owners in Forbes Next 1000 2021.

“2021 was already starting out great for Mycocycle with excellent progress on our SEED round and moving into our new offices,” said Rodriguez. “I am beyond excited about what the future holds for Mycocycle. We are entering into the next stage of our growth so gaining recognition from Forbes via their inaugural Next 1000 list emphasizes our position as innovators of the future.”

According to Forbes, the Next 1000 is “our next big franchise to spotlight and accelerate self-funded, self-driven overachievers, providing a platform for under-represented communities.” They explain that their goal is to highlight entrepreneurs who are not the typical white male profile who lead venture-backed startups but rather feature the company leaders who look like America, are pre-revenue startups and have under $10 million in revenue.

Mycocyle’s vision is to create new circular economies that transform environmentally unstable processes into financially viable material opportunities. Mushrooms will change the way we manage and use waste now and in the future.

“Thank you to Forbes and their panel of judges for this tremendous recognition,” concluded Rodriguez.

View Rodriguez’s profile here.

About Mycocycle

Mycocycle, Inc. was founded in October 2018. It is a woman-owned, early stage cleantech company using mycoremediation to process toxins out of waste. Mycocycle was recognized as a Finalist in FastCompany’s “2020 World Changing Ideas” Awards issue, a presenter for NREL’s 2020 Industry Growth Forum, a 2020 Innovation selection in the EPA’s Innovation and America Recycle’s Fair, and the winner of the Cleantech Open National 2020 Resiliency Challenge.  Mycocycle has been named a 2021 Illinois Qualified New Business Venture under the Angel Investment Tax Credit Program. This program provides Illinois-based investors a state tax credit of 25 percent of their investment up to $2 million.

For more information visit www.mycocycle.com.

RT3 has strong presence at 2020 International Roofing Expo®

By Karen L. Edwards.

The International Roofing Expo (IRE) is the roofing industry’s largest educational conference and exposition. RT3 members took advantage of the opportunity to share their knowledge and educate others while also learning at the same time.

The week started on Sunday, February 2 with National Women in Roofing Day. The opening Turbo Talks featured RT3 board member Anna Anderson, speaking about what RT3 is and sharing a glimpse of the technologies that are currently being used in the industry as well as what is coming.

On Monday, February 3, nearly 50 RT3 members met at the Omni Hotel and were shuttled to fellow member KPost Roofing & Waterproofing headquarters for a technology tour. KPost partners Steve Little, Keith Post and Jayne Williams opened their operations and shared the technologies that they have implemented and the difference that it has made for their company’s productivity and efficiency.

Following the operations tour, RT3 members saw a live demonstration of the Mini Macaden, which automates the installation of modified bitumen membrane, reducing the number of crew needed and increasing the speed and quality of the installation while dramatically reducing the amount of propane used. Steve shared that they learned about the automated machine after losing a phase two project bid to a Canadian contractor that came in $700,000 lower. Knowing the requirements of the project, the KPost team was baffled as to how they could have bid so low. To find out the answer, Steve’s team visited the jobsite to see how they were doing the work. That’s when they saw the Mini Macaden in use.

After touring the KPost Roofing & Waterproofing campus, RT3 members visited and toured Globe Life Field, the new home of the Texas Rangers that features a retractable roof. Steve and his project team shared the details of the roof installation and the challenges of installing the PVC membrane on the curved roof.

Tuesday, February 3 started off with the RT3 Contractor Technology panel featuring Ken Kelly, Steve Little, Michelle Boykin, Josey Parks and moderator Heidi Ellsworth. The well-attended session covered how each of these contractors is using technology in their everyday business, including augmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence and more. The goal was to educate contractors and share their experiences to help others consider and implement the valuable technologies that are elevating the roofing industry.

The conversation continues weekly on social media and through the SmartBrief e-newsletter. Follow us on Twitter (@RT3_ThinkTank) and join our Roofing Technology Innovators group on Facebook.

The best resources for women in roofing

By Megan Brehm, AccuLynx.

Over the past several years, the roofing industry has seen an increased number of women getting involved in the trade. From field work to running their own roofing businesses, women are proving they can do it all in the exterior contracting world. While women only make up roughly nine percent of the construction industry, there are loads of resources out there to help support and promote growth.

Here are some of the best resources for women in the roofing industry.

National Women in Roofing

With over 1,200 members, the National Women in Roofing organization—or NWIR—was created to help support and advance careers for women in the roofing world. They provide everything from mentors to seminars to recruitment resources.

This is a great opportunity to help connect female roofers to other women who have created names for themselves in the industry. The NWIR empowers women with the right training and skills to help drive the drive diversity and professionalism in roofing.

National Association for Women in Construction

Founded in 1953, the National Association for Women in Construction (NAWIC) is a network for women in construction and exterior contracting industries.

With chapters all across the continental United States and over 4,500 members, the NAWIC gives women in construction and other exterior contracting trades, such as roofing, resources to get the job done and advance their careers. They provide professional opportunities such as mentoring, the latest industry news and community outreach projects. There are also educational resources including leadership development and career path plotting assistance.

Canadian Association for Women in Construction

Canada has its own organization for women roofers, as well. Similar to the NAWIC, the Canadian Association for Women in Construction is designed to provide considerable resources to women in a variety of exterior contracting trades—including roofing.

The CAWIC gives women in the Canadian construction industry access to professional and educational resources, much like the NAWIC. For everything from new ways to enhance their careers to learning what is new in their industry, the CAWIC has created a way to connect female roofers throughout Canada.

These resources are perfect for connecting female roofers to a larger community. AccuLynx is proud to be a part of that community! As a provider to some of the best roofing businesses, including women-owned roofing companies, we make it easy to manage everything needed on a daily basis.

Get more industry news like this in your inbox each week when you sign up for the Smart Brief e-newsletter.

Source: AccuLynx. 

How Women Are Changing the Roofing Industry

By Cotney Construction Law

Construction has always been a male-dominated field. Women currently make up nine percent of the construction industry, which is a small percentage when compared with other industries. Even fewer women work in the roofing industry specifically; statistics from 2014 reveal that only 0.5 percent of U.S. roofers are female.

However, an increasing number of women are stepping up to the plate. Our roofing attorneys are here to discuss how female workers and leaders are making a difference in the industry.

Filling the Labor Void

The construction industry is facing a labor void for a variety of reasons. Prior to 2006, there was a surplus of workers, but the recession eliminated millions of construction jobs. Though our nation and industry have recovered, the general desire to work in construction seems to have diminished. This combined with the baby boomers’ retirement has created a labor void.

Women are an important part of filling this labor void, especially in roofing. Many women can withstand the physical demands of the job as well as men. Others are making waves in business or leadership positions.
The labor void is a serious issue facing the roofing industry. Maintaining an open mind when it comes to hiring more women will help us gain qualified workers and a fresh perspective.

Relating to Female Clients

Unfortunately one of the stereotypes surrounding the construction industry (and other male-dominated industries such as auto mechanics) is that female customers can get scammed or overcharged because they have little knowledge of the traditionally male industry.

Having female representation in your company can help set prospective female clients at ease. According to Forbes, women now represent 70 to 80 percent of all consumer purchasing power. In some instances, women respond better to female representation when it comes to a new roof or roof repair. It can add a greater relatability factor and help alleviate the fear of being overcharged.

National Women in Roofing

Since it can be hard to get established in such a traditionally male field, National Women in Roofing (NWIR) was established to help support and advance the careers of female roofing professionals.
The nonprofit organization’s four main goals are:

  1. Recruiting
  2. Networking
  3. Education
  4. Mentoring

NWIR knows how much women can continue to benefit the roofing industry. It also recognizes how much intentionality and support is needed in this transition. NWIR welcomes both female roofing professionals and male roofing professionals who support the cause.

Source: Cotney Construction Law

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

 

How women are changing the roofing industry

Women currently make up nine percent of the construction industry, which is a small percentage when compared with other industries. Construction has always been a male-dominated field. Even fewer women work in the roofing industry specifically; statistics from 2014 reveal that only 0.5 percent of U.S. roofers are female.

However, an increasing number of women are stepping up to the plate and female workers and leaders are making a difference in the industry.

Filling the Labor Void

The construction industry is facing a labor void for a variety of reasons. Prior to 2006, there was a surplus of workers, but the recession eliminated millions of construction jobs. Though our nation and industry have recovered, the general desire to work in construction seems to have diminished. This combined with the baby boomers’ retirement has created a labor void.

Women are an important part of filling this labor void, especially in roofing. Many women can withstand the physical demands of the job as well as men. Others are making waves in business or leadership positions.

The labor void is a serious issue facing the roofing industry. Maintaining an open mind when it comes to hiring more women will help us gain qualified workers and a fresh perspective.

Relating to Female Clients

Unfortunately, one of the stereotypes surrounding the construction industry (and other male-dominated industries such as auto mechanics) is that female customers can get scammed or overcharged because they have little knowledge of the traditionally male industry.

Having female representation in your company can help set prospective female clients at ease. According to Forbes, women now represent 70 to 80 percent of all consumer purchasing power. In some instances, women respond better to female representation when it comes to a new roof or roof repair. It can add a greater relatability factor and help alleviate the fear of being overcharged.

National Women in Roofing

Since it can be hard to get established in such a traditionally male field, National Women in Roofing (NWIR) was established to help support and advance the careers of female roofing professionals.

The nonprofit organization’s four main goals are:

  • Recruiting
  • Networking
  • Education
  • Mentoring

NWIR knows how much women can continue to benefit the roofing industry. It also recognizes how much intentionality and support is needed in this transition. NWIR welcomes both female roofing professionals and male roofing professionals who support the cause.

Note: This article first appeared on Cotney Construction Law’s blog and can be viewed here.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Five Strategies for Making Construction Companies Better for Women

BuiltWorlds recently facilitated a Future Workforce Forum meeting exploring the challenges faced by women in construction. The forum participants heard presentations about the personal experiences of women in the industry, while also engaging in a lively discussion about ways companies should respond to the hurdles that women face. The group came up with five concrete solutions for companies to make themselves welcoming to women:

  1. Qualify female colleagues

Numerous studies, such as this one from the American Association of University Women, have shown that women are often viewed as less competent than their male counterparts. One small way to address this issue is to highlight your female colleagues qualifications when you introduce them.

For example, Jamie Redmond, the Director of Operations at Redmond Construction, related that when she’s in a business meeting, one of her peers informs everyone, “this is Jamie, she leads our operations; she’s a great resource for you.”

  1. Amplify women’s ideas

Men often take women’s ideas and claim them as their own (see Dr. Arin Reeves’ study, “Mansplaining, Manterrupting & Bropropriating.”) In order to combat this issue, Redmond emphasized the importance of repeating a woman’s idea and crediting her for the idea ideas. It’s as simple as saying, “as Jamie pointed out, we should really pay more attention to this marketing campaign.”

  1. Ladies — make yourself a seat at the table.

According to the Harvard Business Review, the way women’s colleagues treat them is almost entirely due to bias and has no correlation with women’s actions. However, in hostile environments, women often have no recourse but to develop a thick skin and hold their ground.

Cathy Osborne, the VP of HR at Leopardo admitted that when she started at the company, the male leaders had a difficult time listening to her. “We had cultural issues because they were not used to having women in a leadership role,” Osborne said. “They’d say, ‘Cathy you don’t know construction.’ I’d say, ‘It’s not about construction. It’s about human capital…’ I have a seat at the table and I’m a business partner.”

  1. Put women in positions of power

Women in power empower other women. For example, as a smart, driven woman, Osborne recognizes the importance of recruiting and retaining female employees. Since she started at Leopardo, the company has “been seeing more strong project engineers, project managers, on the female side.” Osborne also makes sure that male superintendents support her project engineers. In large part due to Osborne’s work, Leopardo is now 27 percent female, not including the trades.

Lauren Enders, a Project Manager at Vortex Flooring, observed that having women run the show benefits everyone. “We have our first female partner,” she said. “She’s really good at maintaining a positive environment for our team… the women in our office make shit happen.” This, of course, means that women in power also empower the men around them.

  1. Make work-life balance a company priority

Women with children often hesitate to take on leadership roles in the field because of the large time commitment demands associated with supervisory positions. Roseanna Bloxham, a senior geo-environmental engineer at environmental consultancy RSK, observed in this article, “it’s really difficult for working mothers to be on site by 8 am, because most childcare facilities are not open at 6am, when they would need to drop off their children. Therefore, after having children female engineers are still tending to go back into desk roles.”

The industry cannot afford to deprive talented women from field leadership opportunities. If you want to attract young parents of all genders into field leadership, you need to implement family friendly policies. Try developing generous paid maternity and paternity leave policies. Look into flexible working options — in the digital age, a lot of office work can be completed at home. Hire assistants for your supervisors who can take on their administrative tasks. You will attract and retain more skilled employees with these policies.

With a precipitous decline in skilled labor, the construction industry cannot afford to alienate 50 percent of the workforce. By implementing these five strategies, you will make your company more competitive and profitable.

Note: This article first appeared on BuiltWorlds’ website and can be viewed here.